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7 Books To Read If You Absolutely Adored “Wonder Woman”

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Since sailing to Themyscira and sneaking into their libraries isn’t an option…

…we’ll just have to make do with the books we have here. Fortunately, there are quite a few excellent options out there:

 

1. The Moon Riders (Moon Riders #1) by Theresa Tomlinson

Set during the Trojan War, this book tells the story of Myrina, a young girl whose dearest wish is to join the ranks of the Moon Riders (the Amazons). In this version of the story, the Riders not only fight in the deadliest of battles, but also perform ritual dances in honor of Earth Mother Maa.

Myrina quickly feels at home among the Riders, and even befriends Cassandra, prophetess and Princess of Troy. But war soon breaks out, and Myrina and the other Riders must decide just how far they are willing to go to try and save the doomed city of Troy…

Wonder Woman books
Source: Amazon

2. The Protector of the Small Series by Tamora Pierce

While Diana grew up surrounded by hordes of other badass warrior women, Kel wasn’t so lucky. She is the first Tortallan girl in over a century to claim what is rightfully hers and begin training to become a knight, and she’ll let nothing stand in her way.

Wonder Woman books
Source: Amazon

3. The Lost Sisterhood by Anne Fortier

Oxford lecturer Diana Morgan is an expert on ancient Greek mythology and is more than a little obsessed with the Amazons. But then she receives a mysterious, impossible-to-resist offer to travel to North Africa and decipher a recently unearthed temple inscription. Before she knows it, Diana is caught up in a dangerously seductive treasure hunt that dates all the way back to the Trojan War.

Wonder Woman books
Source: Amazon

4. Crown Duel by Sherwood Smith

One of the things that struck me most about Wonder Woman was Diana’s innocence and vulnerability: heroines don’t have to be impervious to emotion, people! And that’s also one of the things I love most about Meliara, the heroine of Sherwood Smith’s Crown Duel. She may be naive when it comes to the ways of the world, she may make mistakes (a lot of them), but she always stays true to herself and, above all, keeps fighting for the people she loves and the principles she believes in.

Wonder Woman books
Source: Amazon

5. Graceling by Kristin Cashore

If you haven’t read Graceling by now, you’ve either suffered a cruel and unusual new form of torture that centers on pop culture deprivation, or you’ve purposely avoided it. Whatever the case, YOU NEED TO READ IT NOW. It won’t take up more than a few hours of your life, but reading about Katsa, the girl born able to kill a man with her bare hands, and Po, the foreign prince whose talent isn’t what it appears, will change your life for the better.

Wonder Woman books
Source: Amazon

6. The Cry of the Icemark by Stuart Hill

This fantasy classic has it all–the brave warrior princess (who isn’t just a token warrior princess, but actually leads her country, forms alliances with Snow Leopards and Vampires, and battles against the greatest army the world has ever known), the indomitable Hypollitans (based on the Amazons!), and a healthy dose of sarcasm and wit.

Wonder Woman
Source: Amazon

7. The Amazons: Lives and Legends of Warrior Women Across the Ancient World by Adrienne Mayor

If you’re not in the mood for a fictional read, check out Adrienne Mayor’s book: it delves deep into the historical, archaeological, and mythological roots of the Amazons and brings those ancient women back to life.

Wonder Woman
Source: Amazon

What book would you recommend for a Wonder Woman fan?

YouTube Channel: KinoCheck International

 

Featured image via inquisitr

J.K. Rowling Has BRILLIANT Plan For Trump’s U.K. Visit And It Involves His ‘Vile Tweets’

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A long-standing opponent of President Trump, J.K. Rowling has devised the perfect plan for British citizens to “show support” for the American leader during his visit to the U.K. in the fall.

This comes as a response to Trump’s highly controversial tweets about the recent terrorist attack in London, which, as Press Secretary Sean Spicer has stated, should be considered “official statements by the president of the United States.”

Rowling’s plan centers on holding Trump accountable for those tweets and allowing Brits to demonstrate their…appreciation…for the American president:

Source: Aplus
Source: Aplus

Of course, this is all assuming that Trump’s visit isn’t cancelled altogether. In addition to nearly 2 million Brits who have signed a petition demanding that PM Theresa May cancel Trump’s visit, London Mayor Sadiq Khan has insisted on more than one occasion that Trump not be invited to the U.K.

The first occasion was the announcement of Trump’s infamous travel ban, which Khan denounced as “cruel and shameful.” But after Trump’s reaction to the London terror attack, Khan has once again stated that the president’s visit must be cancelled.

Trump not only seized on the London attack as an opportunity to promote his travel ban, but also made specious allegations regarding Khan’s handling of the attack. According to CNN, Khan told Londoners that the increased police presence in the city was “no cause for alarm.” Trump, of course, omitted those pertinent facts in his Twitter statement:

Source: Aplus
Source: Aplus

Since then, Khan has spoken out against Trump’s actions: “When you have a special relationship, it is no different from when you have got a close mate. You stand with them in times of adversity, but you call them out when they are wrong.”

What do you think of Rowling’s plan? Should Trump’s visit be cancelled? Share your thoughts below!

YouTube Channel: Inside Edition

 

Featured image via businessinsider

h/t Aplus

After 52 Years, An Overdue Library Book Is Returned With An Apology

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You wake up in a cold sweat. You forgot to return your library book. Rummaging through the shelves, drawers and cubbies of your home, you wonder what would be the best way to return it. Explain it to the librarian? Drop it in the return box? Whether or not you have had the experience of possessing a late library book, here is the true and interesting story of the person who returned their library book after 52 years!

Source: abcNEWS
Source: abcNEWS

For context, the book in question was W.O Mitchell’s novel Who Has Seen The Wind. The bildungsroman details a boy confronting important topics such as life and death. Since it’s initial publication in 1947, the book was popular for many readers. The book was taught in a number of Canadian educational institutions and even received a movie adaptation in 1977.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

The tragic disappearance was apparent after the book’s due date on September 29, 1965. The Noah Webster Library in West Hartford had one extra overdue book that day, not knowing it would be the longest missing book they would have 52 years later.

Source: We-ha
Source: We-ha

The director of the library, Martha Church, worked for 40 years and never saw a book that was overdue for so long: “52 years is probably a record.” She speculated, “It was most likely checked out in August–a beach read, possibly.”

It was definitely a surprise for Martha and other staff members of the library when the book arrived at the library with a sticky note. Attached with two pieces of tape, the note sheepishly says, “Returning this book to you after too many years. Sorry it has taken so long.”

Source: abcNEWS
Source: abcNEWS

Not sure what to do, the employees brought it to Martha and she decided to hand it over to the staff who worked on the Facebook page. Out of all their content, their newly reclaimed book received the most attention with 310 reactions to date.

With the final chapters of the overdue book in Noah Webster Library coming to a happy end, here is a wonderful song to commemorate its return! Remember folks: bring your books back!

YouTube Channel: bbmsmedia

 

Featured image via Facebook

h/t abcNEWS

The New York Public Library Introduces ‘Subway Library’ With Free E-Books

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Source: New York Public Library

You know when it’s really hot outside and you live in a huge, crowded city and you need to use public transportation and it’s the worst thing that’s ever happened to you? To make that process slightly less terrible, this summer, New York City commuters will have access to tons of free reading material.

The New York Public Library has announced Subway Library, which its blog describes as “a new initiative between The New York Public Library, Brooklyn Public Library, and Queens Library, the MTA, and Transit Wireless that provides subway riders in New York City with free access to hundreds of e-books, excerpts, and short stories—all ready to read on the train.”

 New York Public Library
Source: New York Public Library

According to Bustle, “Riders can access e-books and short stories from The New York Public Library’s permanent collection, as well as excerpts made available through the generosity of publishers including Hachette Book Group, HarperCollins Publishers, Penguin Random House, Plympton, and Simon & Schuster.”

MTA customers can access the Subway Library by logging onto the TranslitWirelessWifi network and clicking on the prompt for SubwayLibrary.com. There’s a broad selection of reading titles for all ages, and there’s even a “Library Train,” which is decorated like the Rose Main Reading Room at the NYPL branch on 42nd Street. This train will alternate between running on the E and F lines.

Source: NYPL.org
Source: NYPL.org

In between reading, you can enter to win some cool prizes. To enter, post a photo of yourself on Instagram or Twitter, either in the Library Train or in front of a Subway Library poster. Tag @MTA and @TWWifi and use the hashtag #SubwayLibrary, and you’ll have a chance to win an Amazon Kindle Voyager or a “special prize from the NYPL shop”  (three winners will be chosen for each).

Happy reading, sweaty masses!

YouTube Channel: Dj Hammer

 

Featured image via NYPL

h/t NPYL

The 15 Hottest Business And Leadership Books Of 2017

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Looking for some fascinating beach reads this summer? Even when your head’s in the clouds you can keep your mind focused on winning with these strategy-centric books that everyone is reading right now. If you’re looking to start a business, create new work habits or even declutter your life, these best-selling books offer a number of ideas and solutions from experts in your field.

So even if you’re on vacation, toss these business books in your tote and get yourself on top of your game!

 

1. Business Adventures by John Brooks

Stories about Wall Street are infused with drama and adventure in this inside look at how iconic companies are defined by moments of fame or notoriety. Written by New Yorker contributer John Brooks, Business Adventures features financial journalism stories that will both entertain and inform readers. Don’t believe us? This quote from a little well-known businessman may sway you:

Business Adventures remains the best business book I’ve ever read.” – Bill Gates, The Wall Street Journal.

best business books
Source: Amazon

2. Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin

Jocko Willink and Leif Babin are two former Navy SEAL’s who, after departing the SEAL Teams, launched Echelon Front, a company that teaches leadership principles to businesses and organizations. Extreme Ownership is a series of combat stories that are translated into lessons for business and life, showing how to apply the principles that enable SEAL units to accomplish difficult missions in combat to any team, family or organization.

best business books
Source: Amazon

3. The Healthy Habit Revolution by Derek Doepker

Summer is a great time to press the reset button on some of the more negative aspects of your life. The Healthy Habit Revolution promises that personal transformation only takes five minutes a day. This self-help bestseller uses cutting-edge research from behavioral, cognitive and human needs psychology and puts it into a daily step-by-step blueprint for creating better, healthier habits.

best business books
Source: Amazon

4. How To Read Literature Like A Professor by Thomas C. Foster

Sure, this may not sound like a business book, but its message appeals to many savvy leaders who understand how fiction is a great tool in teaching people how to influence and understand others. Thomas C. Foster’s guide helps readers to discover hidden truths by looking at literature with the eyes and literary codes of a college professor.

best business books
Source: Amazon

5. I Will Teach You To Be Rich by Ramit Sethi

This personal finance classic has been one of Amazon’s top sellers for over eight years. In I Will Teach You To Be Rich, Sethi offers readers in their 20s and 30s a 6-week personal finance program based around the four pillars of banking, saving, budgeting and investing. This books has remained a best-seller due in large part to its practical approach to finance and nonjudgmental style.

best business books
Source: Amazon

6. The Life-Changing Magic Of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo

Don’t feel like leaving the cool comfort of your air-conditioned home in the dead of summer? Spend some time indoors being productive and cleaning up your space! In the international best-seller The Life-Changing Magic Of Tidying Up, Japanese cleaning consultant Marie Kondo gives readers step-by-step instructions through her revolutionary KonMari Method on how to defeat clutter.

best business books
Source: Amazon

7. Manage Your Day-to-Day by 99U

If you’re feeling over-extended and overwhelmed at work, or even in life, take some time while you’re relaxing in the sun to work on how to de-stress during your normal busy day. 99U is a highly-regarded creativity and productivity website that provides actionable insights to help creative people push ideas forward, and Manage Your Day-to-Day is a toolkit for tackling new challenges 24/7. You’ll return to work rested, refreshed and ready to increase your productivity!

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

8. Mini Habits by Stephen Guise

If you’ve been thinking about making changes in your life, what’s holding up your progress might be your approach. Stephen Guise recommends implementing “mini habits,” which are small, positive behaviors that you force yourself to do every day. Mini Habits promotes the idea that the best way to make big changes is through baby steps.

best business books
Source: Amazon

9. The Power Of Habit by Charles Duhigg

The New York Times Bestseller The Power Of Habit provides another take on how to overhaul your habits. Pulitzer Price-winning business reporter Charles Duhigg leans on science to explain how habits are formed and broken, including engrossing narratives that show how, by understanding how habits work, we can transform our businesses, our communities and our lives.

best business books
Source: Amazon

10. Option B by Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant

Option B has landed on Amazon’s bestseller list three times in three different formats. It chronicles Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg’s efforts to move forward after the tragic death of her husband. Her friend, psychologist Adam Grant, chimes in with eye-opening research on the power of resilience. Their stories reveal the capacity of the human spirit to persevere and rediscover joy.

best business books
Source: Amazon

11. Predictably Irrational by Dan Ariely

Believe it or not, the current economic turmoil is built in large part to our individual irrational decisions. Think about it—do you ever splurge on a lavish meal but cut coupons to save money on a can of soup? It’s the ultimate penny-wise, dollar-foolish mindset. Behavioral economist Dan Ariely refutes the common assumption that humans behave in fundamentally rational ways, examining instead how we consistently overpay, underestimate and procrastinate. He argues that these behaviors are not random nor senseless, but instead systematic and predictable.

business books
Source: Amazon

12. The Second Machine Age by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

The Second Machine Age examines how technology is radically disrupting the economy—however, the message of the book is still a positive one. Instead of only dwelling on the economic slump we’re currently in, it instead provides and optimistic and hopeful look at the future, identifying the best strategies for survival and new paths to prosperity.

business books
Source: Amazon

13. 10-Minute Mindfulness by S.J. Scott and Barrie Davenport

Whether you believe it or not, there’s always time for mindfulness. In 10-Minute Mindfulness, authors Scott and Davenport teach readers how to anchor themselves in the present moment, even if only for a few minutes at a time through 71 different techniques. Incorporating mindfulness through your entire day promises inner peace and improved focus, productivity and happiness.

best business books
Source: Amazon

 14. 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do by Amy Morin

What first appeared as a viral sensation blog post, 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do is now a best-selling book by psychotherapist Amy Morin. A few of the strategies she includes are:

  1. Don’t waste time feeling sorry for yourself
  2. Don’t give away your power
  3. Don’t shy away from change
  4. Don’t focus on things you can’t control
  5. Don’t worry about pleasing everyone

And many more that work for everyone, from homemakers to soldiers and teachers to CEOs!

best business books
Source: Amazon

15. The Upstarts by Brad Stone

The Upstarts is the perfect summer read for any entrepreneur. The book takes a look deep inside the new Silicon Valley, and how a new generation of entrepreneurs (like the founders of Uber and Airbnb) is using technology to upend convention and disrupt industries.

best business books
Source: Amazon

Who says you can’t work towards improving yourself or your business method even when you’re on vacation? These books are sure to help you move forward even when you’re taking it easy!

YouTube Channel: thegatesnotes

 

Featured image via Business News Daily

h/t Inc

Gregory Mone Co-Authors New Science Adventure Books With Bill Nye

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Source: Disney Wiki

Bill Nye the Science Guy is well-known for his beloved television series from the 90’s that taught children to love science. Nye has teamed up with author Gregory Mone for a new series meant to reach young children, and to inspire them through science. Mone is known for several science and adventure books including FishDangerous Waters: An Adventure on the Titanic, and The Truth About Santa.

Their new series is aimed at children between 3 to 7, but is open to all ages. It follows 12 year old foster child Jack, and his two foster siblings, Ava and Matt, as they embark on an adventure that begins when they meet Dr. Hank Witherspoon (a character loosely based on Nye). The children follow Witherspoon to Antarctica to investigate the disappearance of a colleague. The first in the series was released in April, and is entitled Jack and the Geniuses at the Bottom of the World. The second book, Jack and the Geniuses: In the Deep Blue Sea is set for a September 12th release. The three children will travel with Witherspoon to Hawaii to visit a technology billionaire named Ashley Hawking. An excerpt for the upcoming book can be found at Entertainment Weekly

bill nye book
Source: Amazon

Gregory Mone met Bill Nye ten years ago when he saw him at a cafe, and was quick to introduce himself. The topic of conversation went to surfing, and Mone invited Nye to go surfing with him the next day. Nye surprised him by showing up. This paved the way for the two to reconnect later when Nye was searching for someone to work on these books with. Mone shares that when collaborating, he usually likes to be in charge of the ideas, but while working with Nye, he found that ended up liking Nyes ideas better: “I was thinking of setting the book in the Arctic and he said, ‘No, no, we’ve got to do it down in Antarctica, down in the South Pole, at the research station there.’ And you know, you always like your idea better at first, but then I thought about it and it was totally the right decision. It’s a way better setting. It’s a really kind of a funny, weird, exciting place.”

The idea for the main three kids came from a column Mone wrote for Popular Science, called “You Built What?” The column featured a range of people that built strange stuff, which included children inventors: “It would be a 17 year old kid or a 15 year old kid who built something you would think a kid could never build, a submarine, a nuclear reactor, crazy stuff. When I was talking to Bill about it, I said ‘we’ve got to have kids like this’ and he jumped on it. But nothing they do is impossible. That was really important. That was one of [Bill’s] rules.”

bill nye books
Source: Amazon

Invoking curiosity in children, and getting them to question the way the world works is what Mone hopes will be taken away from the books: “There’s a character in here, Ava, who’s always taking things apart to see how they work and puts them back together. A couple kids might break their parents’ vacuums or take apart the printer to find the electric motors inside, but that’ll be good. We apologize in advance to those parents (Newsweek).”

What Nye hopes kids will find in these books is the same passion for science that he found as a child: “The fire of excitement that I feel about science today was kindled when I was a kid. Like any kid of any age, Jack and the Geniuses love science and seek adventure. Here’s hoping that a few kids read these books and have scientific adventures for the rest of their lives (Entertainment Weekly).”

For more from Bill Nye, you can watch his science Netflix series. Watch the trailer here.

YouTube Channel: WIRED

 

Featured image via Disney Wikia

h/t MV Times

Before The Fellowship: 4 Fantasy Books Written BEFORE Lord Of The Rings

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Source: Pintrest

By this time, most fans of epic fantasy novels have read J.R.R Tolkien’s classic Lord of The Rings trilogy. Published in the mid-20th century, The Lord of The Rings has become one of the most popular and influential fantasy trilogies of all time. Who can forget the fantastic journey of Frodo, Sam, Gandalf, Aragorn, and the rest of the gang, ahem, I mean Fellowship. Their wondrous and fantastical adventure took us to places beyond our wildest imaginations and produced some of the most epic fantasy battles. However, Tolkien was certainly not the first author to come up an  epic fantasy novel. Here are four novels that predate Lord of The Rings, but are similar in style.

 

1. The Well at World’s End by William Morris

To kick start this list we have a classic from the late 19th century that even includes a character named “Gandolf”. Written by William Morris, The Well at World’s End follows the adventures of a young man named Ralph (epic name, I know). Ralph is one of four sons of the king and sets off on an adventure that leads him to the aforementioned  Gandolf and a beautiful maiden. Written in the same mold as Sir Thomas Mallory’s Le Morte d’Arthur, Morris crafts a wonderful epic.

the well at the world's end
Source: Amazon

2. Jurgen A Comedy of Justice by James Branch Cabell

If you love reading epic fantasy adventures, but also want a little stylistic variation, Jurgen was written for you. James Branch Cabell gives readers an irreverent take on romance, religion, and other tropes found in Arthurian tales and epics. Jurgen is the story of man who sets off to find his wife, but instead finds a magical land of maidens and magic. The hero manages to flirt and philander his way across the land, until he meets the Devil’s wife. Although this story takes a much lighter tone than Lord of the Rings, it will still hit the spot for those looking for older, Tolkienesque novels.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

3. The Worm Ouroboros by Eric Rücker Eddison 

If you love the complexity and difficult to pronounce names of Tolkien’s Middle Earth, then you’ll love The Worm Ouroboros. The story takes place on a mythical version of Mercury, featuring the two feuding kingdoms of Witchland and Demonland. Although this book can be a bit of a drag to read due to its language and complexity, it’s still worth tackling. Apart from being an awesome epic fantasy, the novel also explores the cyclical nature of conflict and its relationship with glory.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

4. The King of Elfland’s Daughter by Lord Dunsany

Although this novel was initially panned upon its release, The King of Elfland’s Daughter is considered to be a very influential work of fantasy. It is even considered to be something on the level of The Lord of the Rings. Considering its age, it remains an incredibly readable piece of literature. The tale features an elven princess and her lover, a human prince, the obstacles put in the way of their relationship, and a king with magic powers.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

Although these books are dated, they still hold up compared to newer fantasy epics and are worth a read. If you truly enjoyed reading the Lord of the Rings trilogy, you will no doubt enjoy the books on this list.

YouTube Channel: Lore Guy

 

Featured image via Pintrest

h/t Unbound Worlds

Anthony Burgess’s ‘A Clockwork Orange’ Slang Dictionary Found

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Source: YouTube

Over 50 years ago, A Clockwork Orange author Anthony Burgess began working on a dictionary of futuristic slang terms that he’d invented for his dystopian classic. Now the dictionary, assumed lost by archivists and those close to Burgess, has been found, The Guardian reports.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

A Clockwork Orange was published in 1962 and adapted into a film by legendary director Stanley Kubrick in 1971. The book is known for its violent portrayal of youth revolting against social norms, as well as for the unique language its characters use.

The dictionary is only partially completed. It was discovered in an archive of Burgess’s papers and belongings at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester. According to The Guardian, archivist Anna Edwards said, “We’re thrilled to be making such exciting and important discoveries as we’re cataloguing the collection… We found the surviving fragments of the dictionary at the bottom of a large cardboard box, packed underneath some old bedsheets.”

Researcher Graham Foster added, “Burgess … valued language above almost everything else … He was also fascinated by the slang he heard in his school days, his time in the army during the second world war and when he lived in Malaya during the 1950s… This interest influenced almost all of his novels, most famously in A Clockwork Orange, in which he invents a new language called Nadsat. This is not slang, but it shows a developed and sophisticated interest in exploring the possibilities of language.”

Source: Open Culture
Source: Open Culture

The partial dictionary includes hundreds of entries, but only for letters A, B, and Z. The foundation is currently working on the entries with Jonathon Green, a slang lexicographer. Examples include:

Abdabs (the screaming) – Fit of nerves, attack of delirium tremens, or other uncontrollable emotional crisis. Perhaps imitative of spasm of the jaw, with short, sharp screams;”

and

Abyssinia – I’ll be seeing you. A valediction that started during the Italo-Abyssinian war. Obsolete, but so Joyceanly satisfying that it is sometimes hard to resist.”

YouTube Channel: CineFix

 

Featured image via YouTube

h/t The Guardian

6 Books For An Alternative History Starter Kit

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Source: Alternate History Weekly

“What if…?” One of the most powerful and popular questions people will ask when examining the course of history. What if the Union lost the Civil War? What if the Germans won WWI? What if the spork was more popular? The inability to truly know what would happen in an alternative situation enables authors and readers to use their imagination and picture barren dystopias or picturesque utopias. With that being said, there is a lot of alternative history out there and you might want some guidance. Here are six books that are a great introduction into the genre.

 

1. 1632 by Eric Flint

Starting off this list is a novel that places a small West Virginian town in the middle of the Roman Empire and the Thirty Years War. The townsfolk must find a way to survive their new home while also dealing with the issues of the day. Author Eric Flint uses this anachronism to explore how a sudden influx of modern technology impacts society and the course of history. This imaginative novel allows readers to envision the impacts of modern technology in an older setting.

alternative books
Source: Amazon

2. Bombs Away by Harry Turtledove

Bombs Away has us asking what would happen if Harry Truman unleashed a nuke during the Korean War. The majority of the novel deals with the US having to handle with the aftermath of the decision and the horrors of nuclear war.

bombs away
Source: Amazon

3. Clash of Eagles Alan Smale

The prevailing wisdom is that all empires have to fall eventually, but what if they didn’t? Alan Smale imagines what might have been if the Roman Empire had remained intact and discovered the land mass known as America. The Romans expect to conquer the native population and take their treasure, but are unexpectedly defeated. The story follows the lone Roman survivor and his journey in this strange, foreign land.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

4. Farthing by Jo Walton

Farthing by Jo Walton wonders what might have been if the US had never entered WWII. In this alternate reality, Germany and the USSR have fought to a stalemate. Meanwhile, across the pond, the United States, lead by President Charles Lindbergh is seeking to improve ties with the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. The main plot of the novel follows the investigation of a murder that may have political implications.

alternative history
Source: Amazon

5. The Plot Against America by Philip Roth

While we’re on the topic of WWII, let’s allow Philip Roth to walk us through life if Charles Lindbergh had defeated Franklin Roosevelt in the 1940 election. Instead of standing up to Hitler, Lindbergh decides to make peace with him. The Plot Against America follows the story of a Jewish family’s struggles to survive in this brutal landscape.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

6. The Years of Rice and Salt by Kim Stanley Robinson

Robinson imagines a world where Islam and Buddhism are the dominant religions, and China has colonized America. The result is the creation of an incredible epic spanning the course of decades. If you want an alternative history book that reads similarly to a textbook this is for you.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

There are many, many more books in the alternate history genre, each looking at different ‘what if’ scenarios and timelines. The key to really finding a niche you enjoy is discovering what hypothetical situations and points in history you want to read about.

YouTube Channel: Alternate History Hub

 

Featured image via Alternate History Weekly

h/t Unbound Worlds

From Potterotica To Pride And Promiscuity: Getting Between The Sheets With Our Favorite Characters

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We spend so much time with favorite characters, we invest in them emotionally and we want to know how their lives pan out after the story ends. But do we really need to follow them into the bedroom? Some fans do, and they don’t let a little thing like The End get in their way.

 

Potterotica: The Podcast

The original Harry Potter readers — Potterites — grew up and went through puberty with the pupils of Hogwarts: adrenaline wouldn’t have been the only hormone raging as Harry, Hermione and Ron waved their wands and weaved their spells.

Three fans, Allie LeFevere, Lyndsay Rush and Danny Chapman, have turned their fascination into a podcast: Potterotica. As they say in the introduction, it’s about what happens when “your favorite Harry Potter characters get put in slightly more adult situations.”

During each episode, Allie, Lyndsay and Danny read and discuss a hot and steamy chapter from an erotic Harry Potter fan fiction story. While many of the stories are rated “H for horny,” the commentary focuses on the comedic elements. Wonder what J.K. Rowling thinks of it.

Harry Potter erotica
Source: Imgur

Jane Austen Erotica

Jane Austen Erotica is definitely a thing, and according to The Atlantic Monthly, we have the BBC to thank for it, or specifically Colin Firth and his wet undershirt. Many fans cite his emergence from the pond as the moment Elizabeth fell for him. Except of course, that scene isn’t in the book.

No matter, it’s spawned a whole world of Jane Austen Erotica, much of which revolves around the bedtime adventures of Elizabeth and Darcy.

Arielle Eckstut, in her witty and entertaining Pride and Promiscuity: The Lost Sex Scenes of Jane Austen, shows that the master and mistress of Pemberley weren’t the only Austen characters to enjoy a rampant sex life. My favorite vignette is the role play between Charlotte and Mr Collins. Charlotte, disguised as Lady Catherine de Burgh, plays dominatrix. Mr Collins is deliriously submissive.

pride and promiscuity
Source: Amazon

Fifty Shades Of Fan Fiction

The Fifty Shades of Grey phenomenon grew out of fan fiction. E.L. James saw the movie version of Twilight, then became hooked by the novels, apparently reading and re-reading over a few days. She tried her hand at writing sequels, and when she discovered that fan fiction was an actual thing, she self-published and the Fifty Shades publishing empire was born.

She told MSNBC Today that Fifty Shades is, “my midlife crisis, writ large. All my fantasies in there, and that’s it.”

Of course, Fifty Shades has its own fan fiction. As do the works of Tolkien, Gone With The Wind and Anne of Green Gables:

  • What Hobbits do in their spare time: Tolkien fans have so many characters to play with, I’m surprised they need to invent new ones.  For the sake of hobbit hook-ups they do, maybe it’s the dearth of female characters.
Anne of Green gables
Source: Anne of Green Gables.com

Have you ever been tempted to follow your favorite characters into the bedroom? Personally, I’d rather give them their privacy.

YouTube Channel: Shock Show

 

Featured image via Potterotica

10 ‘Goodnight Moon’ Parodies You Won’t Hate

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If you’ve read some of my previous articles, you may remember that I’ve worked in childcare for almost 10 years and that I absolutely cannot stand the so-called children’s “classic” (obviously, I do not agree with this categorization), Goodnight Moon. It’s at the top of my list of children’s books that I just can’t stand reading, and let me tell you, it takes a lot to be on this list. I love kids’ books! There are so many adorable, hilarious, and fabulously educational books written for kids, I seriously don’t know why people waste their time with this uninteresting, nonsensical book that doesn’t even rhyme properly.

Oh wait… I suddenly realize now why people love it so much. It’s because it’s so boring, it’ll put you to sleep. Yep, that’s it.

goodnight moon
Source: Giphy

However, a few weeks ago I was out shopping for a baby shower gift, and suddenly found myself in a bookstore (it’s shocking how often this happens to me) where I spotted a delightfully intriguing title in the board book section: Goodnight Mr. Darcy. Now, I have a deep love for Jane Austen, probably as much as I have a deep hostility for Goodnight Moon, and so I bought the little volume immediately.

Turns out there are many different parodies of this book, all of which are 100% superior to the original. No contest. Keeping this list at 10 entries was tough because there are a lot of hilarious, relevant parodies out there, but these were my favorites.

 

1. Goodnight iPad by Ann Droyd

This book is for every parent who’s had it UP TO HERE with their kids’ obsession with electronics. “And power lights that guide us to pee in the darkness of night.” We all know what that’s like! Also, the inclusion of Angry Birds is particularly effective, wouldn’t you say?

goodnight iPad
Source: Amazon

2. Goodnight Forest Moon by Noah Dziobecki

A pair of macrobinocs! And oh, those Ewoks. I’m such a sucker for Ewoks! Then there’s the storm trooper’s super cool jamjams. I want them. Is it just me, or do those boots look like a smashing pair of flawless white Blundstones?

goodnight moon
Source: Goodreads

3. Goodnight Bush by Erich Origen

For those of you (myself definitely included) who were more than happy when George Dubya left the office, prepare to be greatly amused. The best part is when Dick Cheney whispers hush. And then there’s the pic of Jesus riding a dinosaur! Oh boy…

goodnight bush
Source: Amazon

4. Goodnight Brew by Karla Oceanak

Although I’m not sure why there needs to be a gramophone in the brewery, the rest of the book is adorable. I particularly love the baritone brewer and his foamy mustache! This one would make a fantastic Father’s Day gift.

goodnight brew
Source: Amazon

5. Goodnight Goon: A Petrifying Parody by Michael Rex

A sleepytime book for you own little goons. I feel like a pot full of goo is more likely to actually be seen in a child’s bedroom than a bowl of mush. And I love that the monster actually sleeps UNDER the bed! If you think back to the original Goodnight Moon, I bet you’ll agree that this flying monkey’s bedroom (is that what he is?) is much more similar to your kids’ rooms than the bunny’s freaky tomato orange and freaky domicile.

goodnight goon
Source: Amazon

6. Goodnight Nanny-Cam: A Parody for Modern Parents by Jen Nessel and Lizzy Ratner

Given my childcare jobs, I believe I’m the bilingual nanny whispering “hush.” Except I’m not bilingual. The best part is towards the end: “Goodnight wipes warmer and yoga mat, HEPA filter and sun hat, Sunscreen sunglasses, sleep sack, outlet cap, sleep coach, G&T coach, star charts, consumer reports, vitamin D, anything with Omega-3, French au pair, filtered air and – goodnight Alpha parents everywhere.” Yep, that about sums it up.

goodnight nanny cam
Source: Amazon

7. Goodnight Mr. Darcy by Kate Coombs

*Swoon* Of course Mr. Darcy was surprised by a pair of fine eyes! And I would much, MUCH rather read about Mr. Bingley turning to mush than about a wide-eyed, awkwardly drawn bunny saying goodnight to a bowl of it on his nightstand.

goodnight mr Darcy
Source: Amazon

8. Goodnight Boobs by Aaron Abramson

It’s definitely the most… adult-themed of the parodies, and includes closing time salutes to condoms, lube, and “cheap swill.” And, of course, boobs. I recommend not giving this as a present at baby showers. If you must, maybe give it as an ebook.

goodnight boobs
Source: Amazon

9. Goodnight Batcave by Dave Croatto

Do you seriously think that Batman sleeps? Don’t be ridiculous. The pictures are hilarious, the artwork is actually quite impressive, and Batman is oh so sleepy. I’m not at all surprised that this book is uber cool, since it’s produced by Mad Magazine.

goodnight batman
Source: Amazon

10. Goodnight Husband, Goodnight Wife by Eric Stangel and Justin Stangel

The title sounds sad, don’t you think? If you’ve been lamenting the loss of your carefree single days, read this with your partner and you can commiserate with laughter. I love the reference to the husband’s six pack that’s hiding behind a beer belly and a “solid B cup!”

goodnight husband
Source: Amazon

Other parodies not listed here include Goodnight Keith Moon, Goodnight Democracy, Goodnight Pond, Goodnight Duneand the unofficial sequel to the original, F*** You Sun. No, I didn’t write the sequel myself, but I most definitely wish I had.

YouTube Channel: Funny Girl

 

Featured image via The Shirt List

Margaret Atwood Condemns Anti-Abortion Laws

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Source: Los Angeles Times

Speaking at a BookCon panel last weekend, The Handmaid’s Tale author Margaret Atwood delivered some powerful comments about anti-abortion laws that have been gaining traction at the state level in recent years.

While abortion is legal at the federal level in the United States thanks to the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade ruling in 1973, state legislators have continued to pass measures that make abortion procedures less accessible and more dangerous for women. Recently, lawmakers in Texas have made it nearly impossible for women in the state to have abortions.

handmaids tale
Source: The Hill

Atwood was on the BookCon panel to discuss her dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Tale, which has been adapted for television in a new Hulu series of the same name. The show is incredibly popular and considered eerily timely in the current political climate. When an audience member asked Atwood about the restrictive abortion legislation in Texas, she delivered a powerful speech on the hypocrisy of the government demanding that women bear and raise children but refusing to help them do so:

“Sometimes people have to live their dream. So if living their dream means a lot of dead women and orphans, maybe they’re going to have to live that dream and maybe they’re just then going to have to figure out, ‘Who’s going to pay for this?’ Who’s going to pay for the orphans and the dead women, because that’s what you’re going to have. And I’m waiting for the first lawsuit. I’m waiting, you know, in which the family of the dead woman sues the … state and I’m also waiting for a lawsuit that says if you force me to have children I cannot afford, you should pay for the process. They should pay for my prenatal care. They should pay for my, otherwise, very expensive delivery, you should pay for my health insurance, you should pay for the upkeep of this child after it is born. That’s where the concern seems to cut off with these people. Once you take your first breath, [it’s] out the window with you. And, it is really a form of slavery to force women to have children that they cannot afford and then to say that they have to raise them… So, [if] that’s what you want state of Texas, live your dream. Then we can all watch and see what that looks like, and whether you’re actually going to go as far as to force this upon women and families and not pay for any of it. If you’re drafted into the army, the other situation in which the state seizes control of your body, at least you get three meals a day, clothing, and a place to sleep. So, if you’re going to do that to women, pay up.”

Margaret Atwood
Source: Los Angeles Times

Atwood’s words are a powerful reminder of why The Handmaid’s Tale, and the oppressively misogynist world she created in it, are still so relevant.

YouTube Channel: Broadly

 

Featured Image via Los Angeles Times

h/t Bustle

Ramen No More: 10 Delicious Cookbooks For Budgeting Bookworms

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Do you hear that from a distance? No? It is the faint sound of your wallet and your bank account collectively screaming.

If you pay close attention, you’ll find that the screeching sound gets louder with every check addressed to either college or rent.

At one point, one just wonders, “Alright, I have 26 cents in my bank account and I owe three payments. C’mon, do I really need to eat? I mean, is it that necessary? Camels can live for like six to seven months without food. Maybe I can be a camel. Or join one of those Tibetan temples and learn how to give up worldly desires like food. Who am I kidding. I need money to even get to the friggin’ Tibet.”

Worry no longer, my broke, broke bookworm friend – you don’t need to be a camel. Here are 10 cookbooks that are bound to help you make tasty, healthy, and above all, cheap meals.

 

1. A Man, A Can, A Plan: 50 Great Guy Meals Even You Can Make! by The Editors of Men’s Health and David Joachim 

Just like the title implies, this is a brilliant read for the person interested in making a more-than-decent meal using canned food.

Source: Giphy
Source: Giphy

2. A Man, A Can, A Plan, A Second Helping: 50 Fast Meals to Satisfy Your Healthy Appetite by The Editors of Men’s Health and David Joachim

It has a sequel! If the first few recipes really suited your fancy, here is are 50 more just for you and your cans.

Wait, that sounded weird. Ahem. Moving on.

Source: Giphy
Source: Giphy

3. The 50 Most Delicious Canned Tuna Recipes by Julie Hatfield

While we are on the topic of canned food, one of the most inexpensive items is canned tuna.

While some aren’t too fan of the fish often referred to as the chicken of the sea, one must admit that desperate times call for desperate measures.

Source: Giphy
Source: Giphy

4. Good and Cheap: Eat Well on $4/Day by Leanne Brown

Oftentimes, one assumes cheap meals do not have much of a nutritional value. This little book is one of the many exceptions to that statement.

Source: Giphy
Source: Giphy

5. 101 Things to Do with Ramen Noodles by Toni Patrick

Ramen! The typical college student dish. So many varieties, so many options– 101 of them, to be precise.

Source: Giphy
Source: Giphy

6. The 5-Ingredient College Cookbook: Easy, Healthy Recipes for the Next Four Years & Beyond by Pamela Ellgen

Speaking of college snacks, this is more aimed at students who are barely scraping enough money to attend post-secondary schooling through scholarships, some duct tape, and a prayer.

Source: Giphy
Source: Giphy

7. Healthy Five Ingredient Recipes: Delicious Recipes in 5 Ingredients or Less by Hannie P. Scott

Now you may be wondering, “What if I am no good at cooking?”

Maybe narrowing down the list of ingredients could help a bit. Instead of worrying about remembering what to do with twenty items that you are supposed to cook together, you will be more than fine with only five of them.

Source: Giphy
Source: Giphy

8. Microwave Mug Recipes: 50 Delicious, Quick and Easy Mug Meals by Julie Hatfield

Ah, microwaves. As it turns out, you don’t even need a stove to make a worthwhile dish that will not make you have a severe case of food poisoning at the end of the day.

Just rely on your trustworthy microwave to do the job.

Source: Giphy
Source: Giphy

9. Mug Meals Cookbook – 25 of the Best Mug Recipes made in the Microwave: Mug Cookbook for Everyday Life by Martha Stephenson

If 50 recipes was not enough for you, or if the concept of using a microwave for most of your meals is particularly appealing, here is another fantastic option.

Mugs and microwaves will surprise you in their efficiency!

Source: Giphy
Source: Giphy

10. The Absolute Best Mug Cakes Cookbook: 100 Family-Friendly Microwave Cakes by Rockridge Press

Now, we have talked about meals for this entire article, but what about desserts? What about the broke bookworms with a sweet tooth? Worry not, I have not forgotten about you.

Because you have every right to eat cake in any day you please (other than your birthday), here are 100 different microwave cakes you can prepare any day of the year in a matter of minutes.

Source: Giphy
Source: Giphy

There you have it! 10 cookbooks for the broke bookworm that still intends to eat like a regular person without feeling self-hatred for spending an extra dollar when there are several payments to take care of.

What are some of the strangest dishes you’ve prepared with ingredients that lodged at the very dark edges of your pantry?

YouTube Channel: FlavCity with Bob Parrish

 

Featured image via Pixabay

There’s A Book For That (And 20 Other Totally Weird Book Titles)

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Books are magical, mysterious, entertaining, and sometimes, downright weird. With an oversaturated book market, it’s no wonder we have some strange stuff out there.  I’ve searched the Net for the strangest, most bizarre and puzzling book titles you’ve ever seen. Keep reading and prepare to be bewildered!

 

1. Toilet Yoga (Because Sometimes Sh*t Doesn’t Happen) by John Johnston

A book for the tight ass in your life.  We all know that one person….

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

2. 5 Very Good Reasons to Punch a Dolphin in the Mouth (And Other Useful Guides) by Matthew Inman

Those dolphins are always sticking their noses where they don’t belong.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

3. Does God Ever Speak Through Cats? by David Evans

Yes, but only to the truly special individual.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

4. How to Traumatize Your Children: 7 Proven Methods to Help You Screw Up Your Kids Deliberately and with Skill by by Knock Knock and Bradley R. Hughes

So you can do it before society does.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

5. How to Raise Your I.Q. By Eating Gifted Children by Lewis Frumkes

Now includes recipes and a bumper sticker that reads: I ate your honor roll student!

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

6. The Zen of Farting by Reepah Gud Wan

The backdoor way to achieve Enlightenment.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

7. Images You Should Not Masturbate To by Graham Johnson and Rob Hibbert

I don’t know…the cover’s kind of a turn on.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

8. Make Your Own Sex Toys: 50 Quick and Easy Do-It-Yourself Projects by Matt Pagett

Includes a special bonus chapter written and designed by the finest minds at San Quentin Penitentiary.

weird books
Source: Abe Books

9. Pet Goats & Pap Smears by Pamela Wible, M.D.

Open wide and say “Baaaaaaa!”

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

10. The Stray Shopping Carts of Eastern North America: A Guide to Field Identification by Julian Montague

Nominated for the Pushcart Prize!

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

11. Bombproof Your Horse by Sgt. Rick Pelicano

Because no one likes the smell of burning glue.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

12. Learning to Play With a Lion’s Testicles by Melissa Haynes

I’ve always wanted to know the proper technique.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

13. How to Live With a Huge Penis: Advice, Meditations, and Wisdom for Men Who Have Too Much by  Dr. Richard Jacob and Rev. Owen Thomas

Read this in public and you’ll never be lonely.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

14. The Beginners Guide to Sex in the Afterlife: An Exploration of the Extraordinary Potential of Sexual Energy by David Staume

An addendum to Suicide Bombers: Your Virgins Await in Paradise.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

15. Extreme Ironing by Phil Shaw

Taking household chores to a whole new level.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

16. How to Live With an Idiot: Clueless Creatures and the People Who Love Them by John Hoover

Makes a great engagement gift!

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

17. Cooking With Poo by Saiyuud Diwong

Can you smell what I’m cookin’?

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

18. Do-It-Yourself Coffins for Pets and People: A Schiffer Book for Woodworkers Who Want to Be Buried in Their Work by Dale Power

Number one best-seller in Transylvania!

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

19. Crafting with Cat Hair: Cute Handicrafts to Make with Your Cat by Kaori Tsutaya and Amy Hirschman

Who knew pussy hair was so versatile?

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

20. Dead Pet: Send Your Best Little Buddy Off in Style by Andrew Kirk and Jane Moseley

Crossing the rainbow bridge with a bang.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

Hope you’ve enjoyed the weirdness. Share this list of hilarious book titles with your friends so they can get a laugh, too!

YouTube Channel: Gabe Helmy

 

Featured image via Dream Dictionary Now

15 Stunning Ways To Reuse Old Books

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Whether it’s torn with age, worn by the weather or just plain unreadable, your book no longer has the same luster of youth it once had. Before you sacrifice it to your recycle bin, hold on! There’s hope! If you can’t bear to leave your books, here are some different ways of making your books decorative for your home.

 

1. Book origami made out of book pages

Scrapping old pages of your book into your size of preference can unlock a truckload of decorative possibilities. Your dying books can breathe a sigh of fresh air with its new kind of beauty.

Source: Pinterest
Source: Pinterest

2. Coffee table made out of books

This one might take a generous amount of books but the overall appeal of a book coffee table is pretty cool! Some people even stack piles of books under a wooden plank to craft an easy and one-of-a-kind coffee table.

Source: Pinterest
Source: Pinterest

3. Wall art made out of book pages

Simple, and easy to do! Perfect for making your love of books known in your home.

Source: Pinterest

4. A secret treasure box made out of a vintage book

Books are surprisingly effective at hiding your valuables in a subtle fashion. Carve through a thick square of pages in an old book to store your deepest secrets or treasures. Attach prongs and pins to the book to fasten your goods!

Source: Quirk Books
Source: Quirk Books

5. A book tree, Christmas tree made out of books

Book trees are one of the best ways to express your creativity. You want a simple one? Arrange it from the ground up with just the books. More ambitious? Make branches for your tree from pages! Take a look at others’ creations on Pinterest to gather some inspiration for your very own book tree!

Source: BookBub Blog
Source: BookBub Blog

6. Cards made out of books

You can make your own special cards out of books. Extract your favorite lines and pages from your book of choice and make cards out of it for the people you love.

Source: Popsugar

7. Cake toppers made from book pages

Cake toppers are surprisingly easy to make and add that extra special touch to any occasion. With a little bit of glue, a toothpick, and a cut section from that person’s favorite book (not their exact copy!), you can make someone’s day all the more meaningful.

Source: Popsugar
Source: Popsugar

8. Book Wreaths made out of book pages

With a number of rolled up pages and paper flower, you could easily craft your own book wreath. They act as perfect ways of decorating your living quarters!

Source: The Frugal Homemaker
Source: The Frugal Homemaker

9. Book stools

A bit of glue, a number of used books, a cushion and some wheels will take you far in terms of artistic expression. Make yourself a book stool and whirl around your house in style.

Source: Recyclart
Source: Recyclart

10. Picture frames made out of old books

Books can be emptied for other valuable memories including photos and pictures. Make the most out of your book and replace it with something you would love just as much.

Source: Well Rounded
Source: Well Rounded

11. Coat rack

Hang your coats on your favorite books and add that extra sprinkle of book-spiration for whenever you come home or go out.

Source: Knick of Time
Source: Knick of Time

12. Book tissue paper holder made out of old books

Whether you’re having a difficult day or just reading a really good book, a tissue paper holder made from books is a nice way of drying your tears.

Source: CrookedBrains
Source: Amazon

13. Book shelf

Trust me – they’re not floating books, but they’re close! Liven up your interior decor with some shelves made out of books.

Source: Gent Supply Co.
Source: Gent Supply Co.

14. Bookmarks made out of old book spines

What better way to use your old books then letting them help you read your current books? These fashionable and unique bookmarks are as easy to make as they are satisfying to look at.

Source: Just Imagine
Source: Just Imagine

15. Book bag – a purse made out of old books

With a little bit of sewing skills, crafting your own book bag to take with you to the library (or anywhere really) is a real (and cool) idea!

Source: CountryLiving
Amazon

 

Featured image via I Want Wallpaper

h/t Pinterest, Popsugar

5 Books To Show You Why Climate Change (And What We Do About It) Matters

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Climate Change is back at the forefront of  conversation with President Trump’s withdrawing the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement on Thursday. While the global implications are unsure at this point, it’s certainly concerning on many levels to see care for the environment put on the back burner. We only get one planet, and we’re undoubtedly affecting it in a negative way at this point. Check out these books that explain climate change and what the future could look like if gone unchecked.

 

1. Climate Changed: A Personal Journey Through the Science by Philippe Squarzoni

Squarzoni presents details about the science, politics, and culture of the study of climate change with this graphic novel; his style is approachable and his call to action undeniable. Companion teaching guides are also available as this book is a perfect fit for the classroom.

climate change
Source: Amazon

2. The Madhouse Effect: How Climate Change Denial Is Threatening Our Planet, Destroying Our Politics, and Driving Us Crazy by Michael Mann and Tom Toles

Michael Mann, a scientist and Tom Toles, a political cartoonist, join forces to examine a long history of climate change “denialism.” Toles illustrates (sometimes in hilarious ways) the various fallacious arguments against climate change, and both authors offer ways to counter those with facts and useful information. While the environment is no laughing matter, humor can be a useful tool to disarm naysayers and further productive discussion.

climate change
Source: Amazon

3. Climate Change: What Everyone Needs to Know by Joseph Romm

Romm’s book serves well as an introductory guide for the science behind climate change and its future implications. He presents detailed information in easy-t0-read and understand language and includes discussions of how the environment may impact not just the world’s economies, but also you personally.

climate change
Source: Amazon

4. The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History by Elizabeth Kolbert

Five times throughout the history of the earth, a cataclysmic event has occurred that caused a mass extinction (think: the meteor crash that brought about the extinction of the dinosaurs). According to Kolbert, the sixth is coming and the cataclysmic event this time is humanity itself. She compiles research demonstrating the many, many species of animals and plants that are going extinct and implores us to consider what we can do to change.

Source: Amazon
Source: Amazon

5. Half-Earth: Our Planet’s Fight for Life by Edward O. Wilson

Like Kolbert, Wilson examines the massive extinctions that are occurring around us daily, from the tiniest insects to Sumatran rhinos. However, his book is not as much bleak as it is a furtive look at a plan to stem the tide; he says we should devote half of the planet to nature. Easier said than done, yes, but he offers suggestions as to how we can begin to allow the earth to reclaim its biodiversity and thrive again.

climate change
Source: Amazon

Climate Change is real, and it is a cause for concern, regardless of what any politician may tell you. It’s time to learn as much as we can and be the change that our earth so desperately needs.

YouTube Channel: ABC News

 

Featured Image via Pixabay

h/t Business Insider

Knowledge Is Coming: Harvard Is Going To Start Offering A Game Of Thrones-Themed History Course

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And you thought Jon Snow coming back to life was a surprise.

This fall, Professors Sean Gilsdorf and Racha Kirakosian will be offering an intro-level Folklore and Mythology class called “The Real Game of Thrones: From Modern Myths to Medieval Models.”

Sounds amazing, right? It will certainly be an excellent way to recruit students to the humanities. But what will this course actually look like?

game of thrones class
Source: hbs

According to Professor Gilsdorf’s exclusive interview with TIME, the class will examine the way that the Game of Thrones books and TV show “echoes and adapts, as well as distorts the history and culture of the ‘medieval world’ of Eurasia from c. 400 to 1500 CE” by exploring “a set of archetypal characters at the heart of Game of Thrones — the king, the good wife, the second son, the adventurer, and so on — with distinct analogues in medieval history, literature, religion, and legend.”

Gilsdorf also stated that the course will focus on medieval biographies of queens. Game of Thrones does dramatize nicely some fundamental things going on in medieval courts. Tensions between a queen and the younger women who marry their sons are some ‘Real Housewives of 10th-century Germany’ kind of stuff, where you see these women going after each other,” he said.

game of thrones
Source: giphy

In fact, Kirakosian noted, Cersei Lannister, the “vindictive queen” character from Game of Thrones, shares many similarities with Kriemhild, the primary royal character of the German medieval epic Nibelungenlied. 

Course material will also include Irish prose epic Táin bó Cúailnge (The Cattle Raid of Cooley) and traveler Ibn Fadlan’s account of the 10th-century Islamic world. Hopefully, these adventure- and drama-laden texts will go over well with Game of Thrones fans.

“When I read medieval verse epics with my students, they’d say, ‘Oh, that’s like in Game of Thrones,’” Kirakosian says. “No, if anything at all, it’s the other way around. Isn’t it partly our job [as professors] to use that interest and go deeper?”

game of thrones class
Source: amazngwallpapers

What do you think of this class? Would your professors ever agree to teach a similar one? Share your thoughts below!

YouTube Channel: GameOfThrones

 

Featured Image via YouTube

h/t Entertainment Weekly

Dr. Seuss Is Helping Bankers Write More Clearly

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Source: The Onion

Dr. Seuss books are more than just childhood staples—apparently, they’ve become important training tools at the Bank of England. As The Guardian reports, the bank’s former deputy governor, Dame Nemat Shafik, confirmed this last weekend. Shafik told attendees of the Hay Festival of Literature and the Arts that famous books by Dr. Seuss (aka Theodor Geisel) are used in training to help Bank of England employees write more clearly.

Titles used in this training include How the Grinch Stole Christmas! and The Cat in the Hat. According to Shafik, bank reports were being written using language that was too complex, making the reports difficult to understand for roughly 80% of readers. It became necessary to use “very simple language and very short words” to make the reports more readable, so the bank turned to the popular children’s author’s work for help.

Source: Wikipedia
Source: Wikipedia

“Dr. Seuss was a master at using simple language, at getting children to read,” Shafik said. To make economics more accessible and engaging for the general population, writing about banking more simply is a great place to start.

Personally, I hope this idea takes off and companies everywhere start releasing information in pleasantly metered stanzas. Something like:

Welcome to Facebook! It’s nice to see you.

Last time you logged in was at quarter to two.

You made it eight minutes! You missed quite a lot.

Several more of your friends got engaged. You did not.

Or:

Our work here at BuzzFeed is vital indeed.

Who else provides quizzes Millennials need?

Just answer these questions to build your dream car,

And we’ll tell you which Disney princess you are.

Source: LA Times
Source: LA Times

I got a million of ’em, guys. I’m available to do this full-time whenever the world is ready.

YouTube Channel: Colin Macleod

 

Featured image via The Onion

h/t The Guardian

A Modern Gay Take On “Pride And Prejudice” Is Here!

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In vain we have struggled–our feelings will not be repressed!

Written and directed by Byrum Geisler, Before the Fall is a queer-themed reimagining of how Jane Austen’s most popular novel would play out in the modern American South. Ben Bennett (Ethan Sharrett) is content working as a lawyer in Virginia, but rough-talking factory worker Lee Darcy (Chase Conner) soon arrives and starts shaking things up. It’s hate at first sight for these two men, and their mutual animosity only worsens when Lee is (wrongfully) charged with domestic abuse. Nonetheless, as all die-hard Pride and Prejudice fans know, these two characters’ feelings soon begin to take a dramatically different turn.

In an interview with HuffPost, Geisler stated that this film is inspired by the success of box office hit Brokeback Mountain: though it found commercial success, many critics believe that Brokeback Mountain failed to make complex queer stories accepted as part of mainstream Hollywood. That’s why Geisler has deliberately made “love, not sexuality” the focus of Before the Fall.

gay version of pride and prejudice
Source: fanpop

The decision to set the movie in the South rather than in a city with a well-established LGTBQ community was also a deliberate one. “Appalachia is consistently depicted on film as homophobic and violent [but] the real world is much more complex than these stereotypes,” Geisler stated.

Overall, Geisler is confident in his “traditional and romantic” film and hopes that it will remind audiences of “the basic human need to experience life with the person you love is the same basic need for both straight and gay people.”

Before the Fall was released on iTunes, Amazon, and other streaming services on May 30th.

YouTube Channel: Washington House

 

Featured image via Facebook

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6 Parenting Books To Inspire A Calmer, Happier Family Dynamic

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It’s a cliché to say that there are no books on parenting. Well, there are a lot of parenting books, but they don’t come with any guarantees. The thing about parenting books is that the author can’t know you and your family. However, parenting books can offer some suggestions and ideas that perhaps you’ve never thought of because you grew up a certain way and are consciously continuing old habits that are hindering or harming your family. Whether you’re struggling as a parent or not, it’s always good to open your mind to the possibilities. Here are 6 parenting books to get you started.

 

1. Baby 411: Clear Answers and Smart Advice For Your Baby’s First Year 7th Edition by Dr. Ari Brown and Denise Fields

The seventh edition of this book was freshly published in 2015, so you won’t see any advice that would only have worked in the conservative 1950s. This popular parenting book series mixes the advice of experienced parents and a well-known pediatrician.

parenting books
Source: Amazon

2. Bringing up Bébé: One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting by Pamela Druckerman

After journalist Pamela Druckerman had a child in Paris, she was interested in why French children were so independent, yet curious and playful. She followed her own curiosity and investigated the French parenting style, providing readers with a guide to raise self-sufficient children.

parenting books
Source: Amazon

3. Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child: A Step-by-Step Program for a Good Night’s Sleep 4th Edition by Marc Weissbluth M.D.

Parenting without sufficient sleep can cause a lot of problems, and as parents, one of the biggest reasons for lost sleep is children. In this popular book, Dr. Weissbluth shares his research about creating healthy sleep habits for children, so that parents can sleep well, too.

parenting books
Source: Amazon

4. Calm Mama, Happy Baby: The Simple, Intuitive Way to Tame Tears, Improve Sleep, and Help Your Family Thrive by Derek O’Neill, CHP, and Jennifer Waldburger, MSW

Although this book is directed toward mothers, the advice for staying calm and keeping negativity away from your child is excellent advice for any parent.

parenting books
Source: Amazon

5. The Conscious Parent’s Guide to Positive Discipline by Jennifer Costa

Positive discipline is all about creating a relationship-centered focus in your parenting. Practicing this method will help support your child emotionally and foster their social development, meaning that positive discipline will not only help in the home, but also with your child’s relationships out in the world.

parenting books
Source: Amazon

6. Operating Instructions: A Journal of My Son’s First Year by Anne Lamott

The bestselling author of Bird by Birddelivers a humorous yet humbling story about surviving the first year of her son’s life as a 35 year old single mother.

OI
Source: Amazon

If you’re a parent, do parenting books frustrate you, or do you rely on them when you’re not quite sure how to manage family life?

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h/t Brit + Co