Source: Ancient History, Et Cetera

The Ancients Weren’t Prude: 7 Books That Prove We Aren’t The Kinkiest Generation

“Even by day, and in a place of public resort,
when her lover shows her any mark that she may have inflicted on his body, she should
smile at the sight of it, and turning her face as if she were going to chide him, she should show him with an angry look the marks on her own body that have been made by him.
Thus if men and women act according to each other’s liking, their love for each other will
not be lessened even in one hundred years.”
― Mallanaga Vātsyāyana, Kama Sutra

The 21st century prides itself on being a sexually uninhibited generation. Growing acceptance of many forms of sexuality and equal marriage rights has pushed us towards the forefront of erotic liberty. But, there were generations before us that had this sexual revolution thing sewed up and in the bag already. Check out some of the books below that will prove that the 21st century isn’t the kinkiest generation.

1. The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana by Richard Francis Burton, Shivaram Parashuram Bhide, and Bhagavanlal Indrajit (Author, Contributor)

It’s only fitting to start with the most renouned book on sexuality ever. Written sometime between 300-400 BC, the Kama Sutra encompases a broad range of topics surrounding eroticism including psychology, politics, social cutoms, Hindu dogma, love, and yes, illustrated sexual positions.

Source: Amazon

Source: Amazon

2. The Perfumed Garden by Sheik Nefzawi, Richard F. Burton (Translator)

Hailed as one of the best Arabic books on erotology, this book was written sometime in the 16th century CE. It is full of sexual advice — some medical in nature, such as how to cure impotence, tips on male enhancement, and how to treat barren women. It also includes sexual positions, erotic stories, and poems that help illustrate the author’s points.

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Source: Amazon

3. 120 Days of Sodom and Other Writings by Marquis de Sade

120 Days of Sodom can be a difficult read. It includes some of humanity’s most perverse and sexually deviated thoughts and deeds, right there in black and white. De Sade wrote the book in 1785, during a time of imprisonment at Bastille. It is said to be his “crowning achievement” on the psychopathology of sex.

Source: Amazon

Source: Amazon

4. The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer

Chaucer is regarded as one of the more “racy” writers of a predominantly Christian era. His characters are very blunt about their sexuality, and he often portrays a sexually empowered female in his tales.

Source: Amazon

Source: Amazon

5. The Mimes of the Courtesans by Lucian

This book, written in 43 BC, is a collection of short stories and illustrations on the oldest profession — prostitution. The short stories tell about the difficulties in the life of the prostitute in the form of dialogue between two working girls, such as rough treatment by men, out of control parties, and competing for clients. They also give vivid tips of the trade, and the compilation is said to have the first written account of lesbianism.

Source: Amazon

Source: Amazon

6. The Priapeia by Unknown

The Priapeia is a collection of 95 poems written in 1781, relating to the phallic god, Priapus. The appendix discusses pagan sexuality that includes things that would cause even the most sexually liberated person to squirm. The appendices go into detail on Latin names for genitalia, sexual positions, bestiality, oral sex, and masturbation.

Source: Amazon

Source: Amazon

7. Song of Songs by King Solomon

Song of Songs comes from the Old Testament of the Holy Bible. Scholars believe Song of Songs to be a traditional Lebanese wedding song written by King Solomon to his new bride. Despite the prudish appearance Christianity has enjoyed, the sensuality in Song of Songs will have you blushing.

Which of these books will you throw on your steamy TBR pile?

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