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Which Books Inspire Doctors And Physicians? (Not What You’d Expect)

Though not known for having great penmanship, physicians and scientists have penned books, both fiction and non, that are must reads. Whether they are written for the more scientific community or a general readership, the writing is compelling and leaves you wanting more. For some of these authors, the knowledge is there, but there is a need for a little extra inspiration in order to start penning the books they want to write. For physicians and scientists, those stories they hold close to their hearts are the sparks to their own creative gene.

While it can be a range of genres that compels one to start writing, what these books all have in common are well thought out narratives, written with care and creativity. Whether the books are for adults or children, they nonetheless provide an inspiration that other books could not. That’s why when asked, physicians and scientists recommended these five books, as sources of their own inspiration.

 

1. The Andromeda Strain by Michael Crichton

One would only be surprised if Michael Crichton was not on the list! Crichton is known for his captivating stories that contain science, medicine, and government intrigue. The Andromeda Strain is no different as it combines science, governmental politics, and space, all in a thrilling novel that is sure to rouse anyone interested in the sciences.

Source: Amazon

Source: Amazon

2. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller

50+ years of being published has not slowed down the source of inspiration this book remains for many authors. Not only is Catch-22 one of the greatest anti-war novels of all time, but it is also witty, smart, and an inspiration for budding authors!

Source: Amazon

Source: Amazon

3. The Hidden Staircase by Carolyn Keene

#2 in the Nancy Drew mystery series and published in 1930, The Hidden Staircase is still mystifying and captivating today. Keene (a combination of multiple writers) intertwines the haunting of a house with the story of a missing landowner. Are there really haunts from the phantasmagoric realm? This book is a clear example of succinct writing for all ages.

Source: Amazon

Source: Amazon

4. The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks

Recounting the tales of people with neurological issues, Sacks writes with the experience and knowledge of a medical doctor (he is a neurologist), and with the care and depth of an author. Though categorized as non-fiction, reading this book allows us to peer into a world we hardly experience ourselves, and allows us to see humanity in dark places.

Source: Amazon

Source: Amazon

5. The Stories of John Cheever by John Cheever

Though not a scientist or physician, Cheever writes stories that are about human nature, which is itself a wonder. Writing about internal drama, as well as stories about the loss of community, Cheever penned a number of long and short stories, eventually winning the Pulitzer Prize for The Stories of John Cheever in 1979.

Source: Amazon

Source: Amazon

Do you have a favorite novel that gets you writing? How about a favorite novel by a physician?

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Featured image via Hemtecks

h/t Medscape