We’ve all become used to using emojis as an unofficial second language in texting–they’re so cute and funny! But Kristina Semenova, creator of the Vaikon emoji book series, is puting a whole new spin on our favorite little frowny faces and smirks. She has partially translated a number of classic novels and fairy tales into emojis, leaving some of the original text but replacing a significant portion with a wide variety of emoji symbols.

Semenova’s creative storytelling method will likely pose no problem for millenials and gen-Z’ers. But for others, who view these imagery-laden texts as less of an interesting puzzle to be solved and more of a maddeningly confusing jumble of nonsense, there’s always the Emoji Dictionary (yes, such a thing really does exist).

 

1. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Alice was…starting…to get very…tired…of…sitting…by her sister on the bank–is this seriously supposed to be easier to read??

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2. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

I don’t know what Dickens would think of this adaptation of his classic Christmas tale, but it’s certainly more colorful.

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3. Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne

I don’t think I even know what half these emojis mean…

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4. Black Beauty by Anna Sewell

Challenge: Try reading this aloud five times fast.

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5. The Call of the Wild by Jack London

Who doesn’t love The Call of the Wild? Discussion question: how does the addition of numerous colorful emojis alter (or not alter) the original tone of the novel?

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6. The Old House by Hans Christian Anderson

A master of fairy tales if there ever was one, Anderson might even be pleased at this new adaptation of The Old House. With all the color and pretty pictures, it’s probably much more engaging for children.

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What do you think of emoji books? A creative twist on classic literature? Or another sign of modern society’s increasingly degenerated literacy skills? Share your thoughts below!

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h/t Entrepreneur