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An Intimate Look Into The Wonderful World Of Book Sales

Have you ever gone to a huge book sale? What exactly happens in book sales? This is a first-person account of what a book sale is really like.

Source: Author's Own Content

Source: Author’s Own

It is 10 a.m. at Vancouver’s Central Public Library. Already, a line up has manifested, stretching all the way to the outside of the building. Known as possibly one of the largest capital projects undertaken by the City of Vancouver, the library itself is staggering, peaking 9 floors. However, today I’m not here to borrow; I’m here to buy.

Source: Author's Own Content

Source: Author’s Own

After around 15 minutes, the line continues, but I’ve finally gone indoors, away from the cool wind and the smell of smoke. I am greeted by the sight of more people and heaps upon heaps of boxes containing books.

Source: Author's Own Content

Source: Author’s Own

Unfortunately, flooding in the lower level of the building forced the book sale to be limited to the main floor. As such, I was a bit disappointed that the number of books would also be cut. Nonetheless, there was still a wide range of books available for many readers.

Source: Author's Own Content

Source: Author’s Own

Along the lineup was the children’s section, isolated away from the other sections. A sheet indicated the price of all the books on sale; of course, they were quite a steal:

Non-fiction – adult books
(hardcover & soft cover)
$2.50
Non-fiction – children’s books
(hardcover & soft cover)
75 cents
Fiction – adult & children’s books 75 cents
Children’s picture books $1.50
Multilingual books
(NOT including dictionaries & language learning material)
75 cents
CDs, DVDs
(including multilingual CDs & DVDs)
$2.50
Books on Tape – adult & children’s 75 cents
Large print books 75 cents
Pocket-sized fiction paperbacks 75 cents
Dictionaries & Language Learning $2.50
“Special Finds” Prices vary

Source: VPL

Contrary to what some people may think, not all books are torn and ragged in book sales. In fact, many of them are in excellent, if not perfect condition. Most of the defects come from minor notes or worn bindings.

Source: Author's Own Content

Source: Author’s Own

Books are organized both on the table and in boxes underneath the tables. Sections were divided into Novels, Art, Children’s, Literature, Science, Social Sciences, Asian Languages and many more. During especially crowded times, you would likely have to wait for someone to move away from the table to have access to the boxes and the tables. Otherwise, moving a box out and taking a peek wouldn’t bother anyone (as long as you put it back)!

Source: Authors's Own Content

Source: Author’s Own

In total, I went to the book sale twice over three days. I reaped my rewards and gathered 61 books (a few manga books for my brother), 6 DVD’s and one Playstation 3 game for around $70. It was worth every penny!

Source: Author's Own Content

Source: Author’s Own

Source: Author's Own Content

Source: Author’s Own

Source: Author's Own Content

Source: Author’s Own

The most important thing to keep in mind when looking around is to never look for specific names. Book sales are a treasure trove of books; it’s always much more fun and enjoyable to discover something new.

Watch this short and sweet video on how to resist (or not resist) a book sale!

YouTube Channel: Epic Reads

 

Featured image via Greene County Public Library